How to stop giving some students an unfair advantage

by Kate Wilson November 02, 2017

How to stop giving some students an unfair advantage

Recently, Catherine commented with some energy on the inequity of certain of our homework practices.  

Whilst we are on the topic of inequitable practices, it is worth stopping and thinking about how we question students. 

When teachers pose questions to the whole class, but only take responses from those students who put their hands up, i.e. the volunteers, these students, according to Dylan Wiliam, actually get smarter. This is because they receive feedback on their responses and teachers clarify what they say.

This is 'teaching the best, leaving the rest' and increases the differential between the lowest and highest performing students. This is not what we want schools to achieve.

Dr Anita Archer says that questioning of this sort further advantages those who are already privileged. So, we need to practise questioning techniques that allow every student to participate in the learning of the classroom.

How do you encourage every student to participate in your classroom?

How you're giving some students an unfair advantage





Kate Wilson
Kate Wilson

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