Why a cognitive verbs glossary is like a set of Russian dolls...

by logonliteracy team August 06, 2019

Why a cognitive verbs glossary is like a set of Russian dolls...

It is common practice to give students a glossary of words, particularly words in a unit of work. In this video, logonliteracy's Pat Hipwell argues this practice is not enough to help students understand key task words or the new cognitive verbs. 

"Providing a glossary or a list of definitions is a necessary, but not sufficient practice because often the definitions are not student-friendly," Pat says. 

"If we are providing students with words that require further defining than it's like one of those Russian dolls where you just peel off a layer and there's another layer inside. It's not particularly helpful!"

Watch the video to find out how you can help students develop a thorough understanding of the cognitions. 

For more videos and helpful teaching tips, make sure you subscribe to the logonliteracy youtube channel or follow us on Facebook


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Why a cognitive verbs glossary is like a set of Russian dolls | Logonliteracy





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